"

You don’t have only one soul-mate.

If you did,
you would have married your best friend
three years ago.
She knows you
better than her right hand,
and she’ll listen to you cry
from eight states away.

You don’t have only one soul-mate,
because people wake up different parts of you—
parts you never even knew existed.

The boy when you were 15
taught you what it felt like
to get caught kissing in a closet
at the party you never should have been at
in the first place,
without his lips ever touching yours.

When you were 18,
a boy let you know what it’s like
to have your heart lodged in your throat,
because he’s moving 2,000 miles away,
And he won’t tell you when he’ll be back.

You wait until you’re 22
to get attached again,
and this time you feel it in every inch.
It’s as if you got struck by lightning—
the Lichtenberg figure crawls
up your arms and across your back,
like his hands on your skin
while you laid in bed together,
and you thought the thump of your heart
was in time with his.

You don’t have only one soul-mate;
Instead, you have soul-mates,
because your heart is huge
and you have the room.

"
you fall in love easily but your heart still isn’t full ; s.m.

Razer Kraken 7.1 Surround Headset
This is my first Razer product and upon it’s arrival I found myself joining the Cult of Razer. The packaging is awesome, design is great to look at (professional, sleek and I love the lights) and feels solid/sturdy. It’s very comfortable (don’t know what people are talking about when they say it’s not and I use it for 4+ hours at a time) and, mostly importantly, it’s performance is out of the ball park.
I use it for gaming, music and movies and have found the surround sound unbelievably realistic (once I even jumped because I thought someone was coming up behind me). I notice so much more depth and texture to my music and movies with these on.
The microphone is crystal clear and I find the sound isolation really good. I get absorbed into whatever I’m doing because of this headset. It can be a bit finicky playing with the volume controls for various programs and sorting out the sound device settings (especially when switching between headphones and speakers) but I’m not bothered by it. 
Sound and music is very important to me so these make me happy. :)

Razer Kraken 7.1 Surround Headset

This is my first Razer product and upon it’s arrival I found myself joining the Cult of Razer. The packaging is awesome, design is great to look at (professional, sleek and I love the lights) and feels solid/sturdy. It’s very comfortable (don’t know what people are talking about when they say it’s not and I use it for 4+ hours at a time) and, mostly importantly, it’s performance is out of the ball park.

I use it for gaming, music and movies and have found the surround sound unbelievably realistic (once I even jumped because I thought someone was coming up behind me). I notice so much more depth and texture to my music and movies with these on.

The microphone is crystal clear and I find the sound isolation really good. I get absorbed into whatever I’m doing because of this headset. It can be a bit finicky playing with the volume controls for various programs and sorting out the sound device settings (especially when switching between headphones and speakers) but I’m not bothered by it.

Sound and music is very important to me so these make me happy. :)

Posted 1 week ago + reblog

Popping bubble wrap at work - it’s fun and makes me happy!

Popping bubble wrap at work - it’s fun and makes me happy!

Posted 1 week ago + reblog

I bought a 10 pack (plus 1 free) sample set of perfume oils from Scent by the Sea on Etsy and here is my review of them. Perfume and reviews make me happy so you’ll probably be getting a lot of things like this. Sorry for the long post.
Kabuki: This was a free sample included and recommended to me by the perfumer when I said I liked oriental and warm scents. All I had to go off was the short description that said it was "inspired by the art of David Mack." I had not come across the art of David Mack before so, naturally, I looked it up - it’s very beautiful (go check it out!) but I had no idea how it would transfer into a scent. Turns out it does this well as Kabuki is reminiscent of vague watercolour brushstrokes, warm colours and has a soft grace to it. It’s warm, wet, oriental, slightly soapy, slightly gourmand and smells like sunlight touching your skin. Now I’m not really sure of the notes but I’m pretty sure there’s some Sandalwood (reminds me of a softer version of Sandalwood Vanilla) in here, maybe a little vanilla, maybe coconut and something floral like Frangipani. It kind of reminds me of Madagascan Vanilla Flower by The Body Shop. This is one of my favourites from the set and I’ll probably purchase a full bottle - nice recommending!
Cote d’Azur: Oh my god I can’t stand this this perfume. I actually can’t try it on again to review it so I’m just sniffing it from the bottle. It’s strong, almost medicinal and bitter to me. I’ve read polarising reviews on this; people either love it or hate it and I’m the latter. The notes are apparently lavender, champagne, vanilla and a hint of coconut but I can’t really tune into one as it’s a headache inducing blur to me. I think it’s the lavender and champagne causing the problem - they don’t blend well at all. Normally if I don’t like a perfume I’ll still wear it and let it run it’s course but I had to try to scrub this off immediately. It’s sad because I see where the perfumer was trying to go with this.
Middle Earth: A perfume that’s meant to smell like Middle Earth? I simply had to get it. It’s quite strong on first application but settles down into something sweeter. I can’t find a list of notes on Etsy anymore so I’m going by my nose. I get a lot of Pine, a slight shampoo smell, hints of herbs (marjoram?) and other woods, it’s slightly fruity, green and resinous. It doesn’t necessarily smell like Middle Earth in a bottle to me but maybe a forest the fellowship would’ve camped out in. The kind of forest where your head is buried into the foliage. I don’t see myself wearing it but it’s an interesting experience.
Cinema Rouge: This is a great and well blended perfume that I have become to especially respect since trying a lot of other perfumes. The name is very befitting for such a perfume and it matches it’s description well. The perfumer describes Cinema Rouge as "a willingness to consort with the seamy side of desire, excess and all things sensual and forbidden. A dedication to the vamp cinema style of Theda Bara." It’s basically a smokey yet creamy amber with a touch of vanilla. It’s a little bit gourmand and spicy - the note I initially thought was anise turns out to be malabar pepper which is rather unique and prominent on my skin. Apparently black orchard is a note but I’m not familiar with it so I’m unable to comment on it. It gets a bit powdery on dry down and can easily be worn on a man. If you like amber scents I would definitely recommend this. It reminds me of various Tom Ford perfumes. I think it’s too dark for use during the day but I would wear it at night when I’m feeling moody, gothic and/or mysterious.
Medusa: Goodness this is an interesting scent, I don’t think I’ve smelt anything like it before. This is a described as an "oriental chypre chaotic evil femme fatal depiction of Medusa the gorgan from Greek mythology." It is rather intense, dark and incensey. I get a large dollop of Patchouli - a pure dark and earthy patchouli. It’s slightly medicinal and sweet at times which, again, would be the patchouli. I can smell a little bit of the oak moss and amber notes listed but I don’t really get much musk from this. I can see it suiting Medusa. As it dries down it smells a bit funky and it’s not really for me but, regardless, is very interesting.
Ganache: I dislike this perfume oil but was at least able to put a little bit on again to review unlike Cote d’Azur. It’s described as “opposites attract: creamy chocolate meets an unexpected visitor for tea.” It’s a very bizarre one and upsetting because I was hoping to like due to chocolate. I don’t really get any chocolate or tea but rather a strange pastry-like scent. A review I read said it smelt like a "french pastry with butter and sugar and vanilla essence and dough" which I can kind of get but it’s VERY RICH and almost off too me. It’s rather gourmand. If done right I think I would have liked it but something in this smells very wrong - I think it’s the green accent and tea note that throws it off. 
Morpheus: I love this SO MUCH - it’s probably my favourite perfume oil from the set. It based on one of the Greek gods of dreams, Morpheus, and the notes are "French lavender essential oil, vanilla oleoresin, and a touch of ylang and amyris wood." You can really tell it’s a natural oil and all of the ingredients smell high-quality. I never knew that Vanilla and Lavender smelt so good combined. The lavender note is very exquisite in this, it’s soft and dreamy - not overwhelming at all. The vanilla is creamy and rather yummy. I can get a little bit of, noticeable, ylang and amyris wood. It’s calming, slightly powdery and I put it on just before I go to bed most nights. I simply must buy a full bottle of this.
Sandalwood Vanilla: Well, what can I say about this perfume oil; it’s basically just Sandalwood, Vanilla and Musk (to a lesser degree) which are my favourite notes so I love this. It’s a woodsy oriental with a hint of gourmand. I find the Vanilla the perfumer uses really yummy and I’m not sure why - it’s sweet and creamy which is good because sometimes I find this a touch too masculine for me. Sandalwood is a rather masculine note and this is basically a perfume dedicated to it. However, the musk and vanilla lighten it and make it gender neutral. It feels like a windy walk down a beach but is also a cozy cuddle up scent. It’s one of my favourite perfumes from this set and I’ll probably buy a full bottle of this. Love it.
Vanilla Chai Tea: This was an interesting choice for me because although I like Vanilla i don’t like Chai Tea - at least the taste of it. I quite like this perfume oil as it’s warm, spicy, cozy and an oriental gourmand. I don’t have a list of notes but I think sugar is a note along with soft spices like cinnamon - it actually smells a lot like Warm Vanilla Sugar by Victoria’s Secret. The vanilla is that same creamy and yummy note and takes the background/base on this but without it I don’t think this would work. I think there’s also a woodsy note in here - maybe Sandalwood? It’s definitely an autumn scent and very homey. It does smell like Chai Tea with it’s creamy spices but although I dislike it’s taste I like it’s scent a lot. It’s smooth and well blended.
Winter Beach: This is a strange perfume oil for me as it evokes memories I can’t quite place. It smells cold and like night air - I can see myself walking along a beach at night with this on. It’s strangely freeing BUT it also smells heavily of soap or some other bath product. There is a smokey note at the very back of a sniff which is slightly reminiscent of a beach campfire. I think there’s a woody note in there too - maybe something like driftwood? This reminds me of my mother and childhood for some weird reason. It’s altogether not really pleasing but interesting. I see where this perfume is trying to go but I don’t quite think it gets there.
La Goulue (not pictured above as I couldn’t find it at the time of this shot): I don’t particularly like this as it’s strong and soapy. Apparently it’s meant to depict “abandon and depravity - featuring chocolate, amber and musk.” I get the musk note but hardly any chocolate unless it’s that ‘chocolate’ note from Ganache which smells soapy and off. It’s a cold and sad perfume so it fits the theme of this perfume. I don’t really get any amber either as it’s meant to be a warm note and this perfume is altogether cold for me. I do get abandon and depravity. It smells like running away with tears in the middle of the night and is quite similar to Winter Beach.
There is some sort of strange underlying note that I can’t place in the blending of these perfumes but it’s not really bad - just weird. If i had to try to place it I’d say it’s a slightly synthetic bath-product scent. In some of these perfumes this scent is more prevalent which distracts me from the other notes. I’d say the sillage of these perfume oils is soft to moderate (it hovers over your skin so you don’t have to press your nose completely against it to smell it) and is longevity moderate at about 5 to 6 hours. I want to buy more sample sets for my friends and family to help them find something they like as there’s a huge variety.

I bought a 10 pack (plus 1 free) sample set of perfume oils from Scent by the Sea on Etsy and here is my review of them. Perfume and reviews make me happy so you’ll probably be getting a lot of things like this. Sorry for the long post.

Kabuki: This was a free sample included and recommended to me by the perfumer when I said I liked oriental and warm scents. All I had to go off was the short description that said it was "inspired by the art of David Mack." I had not come across the art of David Mack before so, naturally, I looked it up - it’s very beautiful (go check it out!) but I had no idea how it would transfer into a scent. Turns out it does this well as Kabuki is reminiscent of vague watercolour brushstrokes, warm colours and has a soft grace to it. It’s warm, wet, oriental, slightly soapy, slightly gourmand and smells like sunlight touching your skin. Now I’m not really sure of the notes but I’m pretty sure there’s some Sandalwood (reminds me of a softer version of Sandalwood Vanilla) in here, maybe a little vanilla, maybe coconut and something floral like Frangipani. It kind of reminds me of Madagascan Vanilla Flower by The Body Shop. This is one of my favourites from the set and I’ll probably purchase a full bottle - nice recommending!

Cote d’Azur: Oh my god I can’t stand this this perfume. I actually can’t try it on again to review it so I’m just sniffing it from the bottle. It’s strong, almost medicinal and bitter to me. I’ve read polarising reviews on this; people either love it or hate it and I’m the latter. The notes are apparently lavender, champagne, vanilla and a hint of coconut but I can’t really tune into one as it’s a headache inducing blur to me. I think it’s the lavender and champagne causing the problem - they don’t blend well at all. Normally if I don’t like a perfume I’ll still wear it and let it run it’s course but I had to try to scrub this off immediately. It’s sad because I see where the perfumer was trying to go with this.

Middle Earth: A perfume that’s meant to smell like Middle Earth? I simply had to get it. It’s quite strong on first application but settles down into something sweeter. I can’t find a list of notes on Etsy anymore so I’m going by my nose. I get a lot of Pine, a slight shampoo smell, hints of herbs (marjoram?) and other woods, it’s slightly fruity, green and resinous. It doesn’t necessarily smell like Middle Earth in a bottle to me but maybe a forest the fellowship would’ve camped out in. The kind of forest where your head is buried into the foliage. I don’t see myself wearing it but it’s an interesting experience.

Cinema Rouge: This is a great and well blended perfume that I have become to especially respect since trying a lot of other perfumes. The name is very befitting for such a perfume and it matches it’s description well. The perfumer describes Cinema Rouge as "a willingness to consort with the seamy side of desire, excess and all things sensual and forbidden. A dedication to the vamp cinema style of Theda Bara." It’s basically a smokey yet creamy amber with a touch of vanilla. It’s a little bit gourmand and spicy - the note I initially thought was anise turns out to be malabar pepper which is rather unique and prominent on my skin. Apparently black orchard is a note but I’m not familiar with it so I’m unable to comment on it. It gets a bit powdery on dry down and can easily be worn on a man. If you like amber scents I would definitely recommend this. It reminds me of various Tom Ford perfumes. I think it’s too dark for use during the day but I would wear it at night when I’m feeling moody, gothic and/or mysterious.

Medusa: Goodness this is an interesting scent, I don’t think I’ve smelt anything like it before. This is a described as an "oriental chypre chaotic evil femme fatal depiction of Medusa the gorgan from Greek mythology." It is rather intense, dark and incensey. I get a large dollop of Patchouli - a pure dark and earthy patchouli. It’s slightly medicinal and sweet at times which, again, would be the patchouli. I can smell a little bit of the oak moss and amber notes listed but I don’t really get much musk from this. I can see it suiting Medusa. As it dries down it smells a bit funky and it’s not really for me but, regardless, is very interesting.

Ganache: I dislike this perfume oil but was at least able to put a little bit on again to review unlike Cote d’Azur. It’s described as “opposites attract: creamy chocolate meets an unexpected visitor for tea.” It’s a very bizarre one and upsetting because I was hoping to like due to chocolate. I don’t really get any chocolate or tea but rather a strange pastry-like scent. A review I read said it smelt like a "french pastry with butter and sugar and vanilla essence and dough" which I can kind of get but it’s VERY RICH and almost off too me. It’s rather gourmand. If done right I think I would have liked it but something in this smells very wrong - I think it’s the green accent and tea note that throws it off. 

Morpheus: I love this SO MUCH - it’s probably my favourite perfume oil from the set. It based on one of the Greek gods of dreams, Morpheus, and the notes are "French lavender essential oil, vanilla oleoresin, and a touch of ylang and amyris wood." You can really tell it’s a natural oil and all of the ingredients smell high-quality. I never knew that Vanilla and Lavender smelt so good combined. The lavender note is very exquisite in this, it’s soft and dreamy - not overwhelming at all. The vanilla is creamy and rather yummy. I can get a little bit of, noticeable, ylang and amyris wood. It’s calming, slightly powdery and I put it on just before I go to bed most nights. I simply must buy a full bottle of this.

Sandalwood Vanilla: Well, what can I say about this perfume oil; it’s basically just Sandalwood, Vanilla and Musk (to a lesser degree) which are my favourite notes so I love this. It’s a woodsy oriental with a hint of gourmand. I find the Vanilla the perfumer uses really yummy and I’m not sure why - it’s sweet and creamy which is good because sometimes I find this a touch too masculine for me. Sandalwood is a rather masculine note and this is basically a perfume dedicated to it. However, the musk and vanilla lighten it and make it gender neutral. It feels like a windy walk down a beach but is also a cozy cuddle up scent. It’s one of my favourite perfumes from this set and I’ll probably buy a full bottle of this. Love it.

Vanilla Chai Tea: This was an interesting choice for me because although I like Vanilla i don’t like Chai Tea - at least the taste of it. I quite like this perfume oil as it’s warm, spicy, cozy and an oriental gourmand. I don’t have a list of notes but I think sugar is a note along with soft spices like cinnamon - it actually smells a lot like Warm Vanilla Sugar by Victoria’s Secret. The vanilla is that same creamy and yummy note and takes the background/base on this but without it I don’t think this would work. I think there’s also a woodsy note in here - maybe Sandalwood? It’s definitely an autumn scent and very homey. It does smell like Chai Tea with it’s creamy spices but although I dislike it’s taste I like it’s scent a lot. It’s smooth and well blended.

Winter Beach: This is a strange perfume oil for me as it evokes memories I can’t quite place. It smells cold and like night air - I can see myself walking along a beach at night with this on. It’s strangely freeing BUT it also smells heavily of soap or some other bath product. There is a smokey note at the very back of a sniff which is slightly reminiscent of a beach campfire. I think there’s a woody note in there too - maybe something like driftwood? This reminds me of my mother and childhood for some weird reason. It’s altogether not really pleasing but interesting. I see where this perfume is trying to go but I don’t quite think it gets there.

La Goulue (not pictured above as I couldn’t find it at the time of this shot): I don’t particularly like this as it’s strong and soapy. Apparently it’s meant to depict abandon and depravity - featuring chocolate, amber and musk.” I get the musk note but hardly any chocolate unless it’s that ‘chocolate’ note from Ganache which smells soapy and off. It’s a cold and sad perfume so it fits the theme of this perfume. I don’t really get any amber either as it’s meant to be a warm note and this perfume is altogether cold for me. I do get abandon and depravity. It smells like running away with tears in the middle of the night and is quite similar to Winter Beach.

There is some sort of strange underlying note that I can’t place in the blending of these perfumes but it’s not really bad - just weird. If i had to try to place it I’d say it’s a slightly synthetic bath-product scent. In some of these perfumes this scent is more prevalent which distracts me from the other notes. I’d say the sillage of these perfume oils is soft to moderate (it hovers over your skin so you don’t have to press your nose completely against it to smell it) and is longevity moderate at about 5 to 6 hours. I want to buy more sample sets for my friends and family to help them find something they like as there’s a huge variety.

Posted 1 week ago + reblog


S by JJ Abrams and Doug Dorst
This book is absolutely gorgeous and I would recommend it to anyone who loves reading. It’s produced by JJ Abrams who came up with the idea of having a book within a book, characters interacting through margin notes and from old school textbooks which had students writing in the margins. It’s written by Doug Dorst who was hired by Abrams to write it.
They say this novel is their love letter to the written word and, oh boy, it sure is. Once you open the case slip you’ll find what looks to be an old library book (with a library sticker and ‘borrowed’ stamp!), the pages feel amazing, it’s printed in full colour (must have cost a fortune!), smells gorgeous (like old books), has multi-coloured notes in the margins and there are lots of pull outs (such as maps, letters, napkins etc) throughout the book.
First of all, I haven’t actually finished this book yet and it’s the kind of book that I don’t think you can ever be finished with. It has many layers to it and you’re constantly learning something new. I don’t think there’s any certain way to read it or conclusions you must draw but it took me a while to figure out how to approach it.
Basically there’s the main storyline The Ship of Theseus written by the mysterious V.M Straka and his editor. And then there are Jen, an undergrad student who finds the book and begins to write in it, and Eric, a begrudged postgrad student of whom the book kind-of belongs to (aka he stole it). They communicate via notes in the book as they try to learn more about it, Straka and themselves.
Some people recommend you read the full Ship of Theseus book first without the notes but I find it quite heavy and lacking without the notes whilst others just try to read every single page with all the notes. I chose a middle ground after a lot of research and read each chapter of Theseus then went back to read the first sets of notes by Jen and Eric before continuing. There are many sets of notes written at different times and read-throughs which can be confusing and spoilerific. Luckily they’re colour-coded so you know what time-frame they’re from and I’d go back to read through the later notes after reading through the whole book.
It reminds me a bit of A House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski as it uses space and words themselves as a storytelling device but it’s not as dark or convoluted. Equally as confusing though. I don’t think it’s a gimmick as some people do and love the ideas behind it. It’s very clever and unique. It’s a serious sit-down afternoon book with tea for me and I’m enjoying indulging in it slowly - this makes me very happy.

S by JJ Abrams and Doug Dorst

This book is absolutely gorgeous and I would recommend it to anyone who loves reading. It’s produced by JJ Abrams who came up with the idea of having a book within a book, characters interacting through margin notes and from old school textbooks which had students writing in the margins. It’s written by Doug Dorst who was hired by Abrams to write it.

They say this novel is their love letter to the written word and, oh boy, it sure is. Once you open the case slip you’ll find what looks to be an old library book (with a library sticker and ‘borrowed’ stamp!), the pages feel amazing, it’s printed in full colour (must have cost a fortune!), smells gorgeous (like old books), has multi-coloured notes in the margins and there are lots of pull outs (such as maps, letters, napkins etc) throughout the book.

First of all, I haven’t actually finished this book yet and it’s the kind of book that I don’t think you can ever be finished with. It has many layers to it and you’re constantly learning something new. I don’t think there’s any certain way to read it or conclusions you must draw but it took me a while to figure out how to approach it.

Basically there’s the main storyline The Ship of Theseus written by the mysterious V.M Straka and his editor. And then there are Jen, an undergrad student who finds the book and begins to write in it, and Eric, a begrudged postgrad student of whom the book kind-of belongs to (aka he stole it). They communicate via notes in the book as they try to learn more about it, Straka and themselves.

Some people recommend you read the full Ship of Theseus book first without the notes but I find it quite heavy and lacking without the notes whilst others just try to read every single page with all the notes. I chose a middle ground after a lot of research and read each chapter of Theseus then went back to read the first sets of notes by Jen and Eric before continuing. There are many sets of notes written at different times and read-throughs which can be confusing and spoilerific. Luckily they’re colour-coded so you know what time-frame they’re from and I’d go back to read through the later notes after reading through the whole book.

It reminds me a bit of A House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski as it uses space and words themselves as a storytelling device but it’s not as dark or convoluted. Equally as confusing though. I don’t think it’s a gimmick as some people do and love the ideas behind it. It’s very clever and unique. It’s a serious sit-down afternoon book with tea for me and I’m enjoying indulging in it slowly - this makes me very happy.


"The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books"
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (via feellng)

"Soulmates aren’t the ones who make you happiest, no. They’re instead the ones who make you feel the most. Burning edges and scars and stars. Old pains and pangs, captivation and beauty. Strain and shadows and worry and yearning. Sweetness and madness and dreamlike surrender. They hurl you into the abyss. They taste like hope."
— Victoria Erickson (via shaileneemarie)


Speakeasy Vanilla Oil by WigglePerfume
This fragrance from the bottle smells pretty much how it does on my skin. It’s strong, spicy and rich. At first I get a dark bourbon vanilla and frankincense but that softens a little into the background and a subtle creamy vanilla comes out. The amber and vanilla base is lovely – perfect combination and artfully blended.
It’s cooler than most of my Vanilla perfumes which are quite warm and it reminds me ever so slightly of Eau Duelle by Diptyque but nicer. Sometimes I get a wisp of Patchouli which is strange because it’s not a listed note. It reminds me of something some of my friends would wear, my hipster alternative friends that is. I think it’s a little too much for the office or fancy parties. It does really smell like it would suit a tipsy day of baking in the kitchen with music - which makes me happy. 8/10.
“I’m not usually a vanilla person. It’s such a classic, feminine, and decadently sexy scent, I’ve always really wanted to like it…but just couldn’t. Well, I’ve fixed that problem! My Speakeasy Vanilla is another thing altogether, not cloying or overly precious. This vanilla does not wear pigtails. It does not have a “daddy’s little girl” license plate holder. This vanilla is a grown ass woman who spent a hot, tipsy day in the kitchen, rocking out to Etta James in heels, perfecting her creme brulee. Or something like that…” – Nani from WigglePerfume

Speakeasy Vanilla Oil by WigglePerfume

This fragrance from the bottle smells pretty much how it does on my skin. It’s strong, spicy and rich. At first I get a dark bourbon vanilla and frankincense but that softens a little into the background and a subtle creamy vanilla comes out. The amber and vanilla base is lovely – perfect combination and artfully blended.

It’s cooler than most of my Vanilla perfumes which are quite warm and it reminds me ever so slightly of Eau Duelle by Diptyque but nicer. Sometimes I get a wisp of Patchouli which is strange because it’s not a listed note. It reminds me of something some of my friends would wear, my hipster alternative friends that is. I think it’s a little too much for the office or fancy parties. It does really smell like it would suit a tipsy day of baking in the kitchen with music - which makes me happy. 8/10.

“I’m not usually a vanilla person. It’s such a classic, feminine, and decadently sexy scent, I’ve always really wanted to like it…but just couldn’t. Well, I’ve fixed that problem! My Speakeasy Vanilla is another thing altogether, not cloying or overly precious. This vanilla does not wear pigtails. It does not have a “daddy’s little girl” license plate holder. This vanilla is a grown ass woman who spent a hot, tipsy day in the kitchen, rocking out to Etta James in heels, perfecting her creme brulee. Or something like that…” – Nani from WigglePerfume

Posted 1 month ago + reblog

Mel and I are having drinks and snacks at our regular cafe Plum - makes us happy. :)

Mel and I are having drinks and snacks at our regular cafe Plum - makes us happy. :)

Posted 1 month ago + reblog

She

five—a—day:

She is made of coffee cream.
Of half-sunken lilypads.
Of fishtails. Of wet feathers.
She is made of fox blood.
Of exit signs.
Of shark teeth and hunger.
Of paper cuts and lemon juice.
She is made of Coca Cola.
Concentrated sugar.
Parch in the throat.
Inconceivable thirst.
She is made of cinnamon.
Candied apple and sweet tooth.
Small hands.
An elephant’s memory.
She is made of split hair
and hand-me-downs.
Books fat with raindrops.
Library fines. Bus tickets.
Broken-winged sparrows.
She is made of go.
Of leaving, but never left.
Of long strides. Of had enough.
Of unsigned postcards.
She is made of poetry.
Of clichés. Of smudged ink
and escapism. She is made
of everything your mother
warned you about at the dinner table:
Ripped stockings,
no respect, loose morals,
asking for it.
She is made of mystery.
Coattails and cigarettes.
Whiskey shots. Cemeteries.
Made of trying too hard,
but still you love her.
Still your heart catches
in your throat when you
touch her. She is made of
tumble-dried bed sheets.
Scatter cushions.
Velvet.
She is made of dandelion spores.
Of grass blades and razor blades.
Of fear. Of bitten lips.
Of Stephen King novels.
She is made of thunderstorms.
Of roar. Of high tide and the
entire spectrum of the colour blue.
She is made of your hands.
Of small courage.
Of your violent need.
She is made of your take.
Of your please.
Of your desperate.
She is made of your hands.
Which is to say
she is made
of shaking.


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